[PATCH 00/37] Manual typos: Overview

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[PATCH 00/37] Manual typos: Overview

Rical Jasan
Typos addressed in this patchset include obvious mistakes such as
repeated repeated words, wrong case or tense, speling mistakes, and
wrong variable names.  The occasional comma is also addressed, where
its absence introduces ambiguity, or its presence disturbs the
sentence.

Verified patches apply cleanly against latest master and that `make
info|html|pdf' completes without error on x86_64.

---
 INSTALL              |    8 +--
 manual/argp.texi     |   10 ++--
 manual/arith.texi    |   16 ++---
 manual/charset.texi  |   68 ++++++++++-----------
 manual/conf.texi     |   10 ++--
 manual/contrib.texi  |    6 +-
 manual/crypt.texi    |    8 +--
 manual/ctype.texi    |    4 +-
 manual/debug.texi    |    4 +-
 manual/errno.texi    |   22 +++----
 manual/filesys.texi  |   42 ++++++-------
 manual/getopt.texi   |   10 ++--
 manual/install.texi  |    6 +-
 manual/intro.texi    |    2 +-
 manual/job.texi      |    2 +-
 manual/lang.texi     |    4 +-
 manual/llio.texi     |   78 ++++++++++++-------------
 manual/locale.texi   |   16 ++---
 manual/maint.texi    |    2 +-
 manual/math.texi     |   36 ++++++------
 manual/memory.texi   |   24 ++++----
 manual/message.texi  |  159 +++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------
 manual/nss.texi      |   44 +++++++-------
 manual/pattern.texi  |   24 ++++----
 manual/probes.texi   |    4 +-
 manual/process.texi  |    2 +-
 manual/resource.texi |   52 ++++++++---------
 manual/search.texi   |   36 ++++++------
 manual/setjmp.texi   |    8 +--
 manual/signal.texi   |    6 +-
 manual/socket.texi   |   28 ++++-----
 manual/startup.texi  |    8 +--
 manual/stdio.texi    |   85 ++++++++++++++-------------
 manual/string.texi   |   24 ++++----
 manual/sysinfo.texi  |   52 ++++++++---------
 manual/syslog.texi   |    4 +-
 manual/terminal.texi |   18 +++---
 manual/threads.texi  |    2 +-
 manual/time.texi     |   40 ++++++-------
 manual/users.texi    |   35 ++++++-----
 40 files changed, 504 insertions(+), 505 deletions(-)

--
1.7.9.5
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[PATCH 01/37] Manual typos: Introduction

Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/intro.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/intro.texi |    2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)


diff --git a/manual/intro.texi b/manual/intro.texi
index d4045f2..cc9c99f 100644
--- a/manual/intro.texi
+++ b/manual/intro.texi
@@ -884,7 +884,7 @@ context.
 
 Some safety annotations may be conditional, in that they only apply if a
 boolean expression involving arguments, global variables or even the
-underlying kernel evaluates evaluates to true.  Such conditions as
+underlying kernel evaluates to true.  Such conditions as
 @code{/hurd} or @code{/!linux!bsd} indicate the preceding marker only
 applies when the underlying kernel is the HURD, or when it is neither
 Linux nor a BSD kernel, respectively.  @code{/!ps} and
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[PATCH 02/37] Manual typos: Error Reporting

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/errno.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/errno.texi |   22 +++++++++++-----------
 1 file changed, 11 insertions(+), 11 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/errno.texi b/manual/errno.texi
index 1068be3..d5429a0 100644
--- a/manual/errno.texi
+++ b/manual/errno.texi
@@ -1322,13 +1322,13 @@ string in the user supplied buffer starting at @var{buf} with the
 length of @var{n} bytes.
 
 At most @var{n} characters are written (including the NUL byte) so it is
-up to the user to select the buffer large enough.
+up to the user to select a buffer large enough.
 
 This function should always be used in multi-threaded programs since
 there is no way to guarantee the string returned by @code{strerror}
 really belongs to the last call of the current thread.
 
-This function @code{strerror_r} is a GNU extension and it is declared in
+The function @code{strerror_r} is a GNU extension and it is declared in
 @file{string.h}.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -1471,7 +1471,7 @@ the problem mentioned above that the error reporting function must be
 called immediately after the function causing the error since otherwise
 @code{errno} might have a different value.
 
-The @code{error} prints first the program name.  If the application
+@code{error} prints first the program name.  If the application
 defined a global variable @code{error_print_progname} and points it to a
 function this function will be called to print the program name.
 Otherwise the string from the global variable @code{program_name} is
@@ -1488,7 +1488,7 @@ afterwards.
 The function will return unless the @var{status} parameter has a
 non-zero value.  In this case the function will call @code{exit} with
 the @var{status} value for its parameter and therefore never return.  If
-@code{error} returns the global variable @code{error_message_count} is
+@code{error} returns, the global variable @code{error_message_count} is
 incremented by one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -1506,13 +1506,13 @@ incremented by one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
 @c like error.
 
 The @code{error_at_line} function is very similar to the @code{error}
-function.  The only difference are the additional parameters @var{fname}
+function.  The only differences are the additional parameters @var{fname}
 and @var{lineno}.  The handling of the other parameters is identical to
 that of @code{error} except that between the program name and the string
 generated by the format string additional text is inserted.
 
 Directly following the program name a colon, followed by the file name
-pointer to by @var{fname}, another colon, and a value of @var{lineno} is
+pointed to by @var{fname}, another colon, and the value of @var{lineno} is
 printed.
 
 This additional output of course is meant to be used to locate an error
@@ -1523,13 +1523,13 @@ value @code{error_at_line} will avoid printing consecutive messages for
 the same file and line.  Repetition which are not directly following
 each other are not caught.
 
-Just like @code{error} this function only returned if @var{status} is
+Just like @code{error} this function only returns if @var{status} is
 zero.  Otherwise @code{exit} is called with the non-zero value.  If
-@code{error} returns the global variable @code{error_message_count} is
+@code{error} returns, the global variable @code{error_message_count} is
 incremented by one to keep track of the number of errors reported.
 @end deftypefun
 
-As mentioned above the @code{error} and @code{error_at_line} functions
+As mentioned above, the @code{error} and @code{error_at_line} functions
 can be customized by defining a variable named
 @code{error_print_progname}.
 
@@ -1541,7 +1541,7 @@ value the function pointed to is called by @code{error} or
 @code{error_at_line}.  It is expected to print the program name or do
 something similarly useful.
 
-The function is expected to be print to the @code{stderr} stream and
+The function is expected to print to the @code{stderr} stream and
 must be able to handle whatever orientation the stream has.
 
 The variable is global and shared by all threads.
@@ -1562,7 +1562,7 @@ The @code{error_one_per_line} variable influences only
 @code{error_at_line}.  Normally the @code{error_at_line} function
 creates output for every invocation.  If @code{error_one_per_line} is
 set to a non-zero value @code{error_at_line} keeps track of the last
-file name and line number for which an error was reported and avoid
+file name and line number for which an error was reported and avoids
 directly following messages for the same file and line.  This variable
 is global and shared by all threads.
 @end deftypevar
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[PATCH 03/37] Manual typos: Virtual Memory Allocation and Paging

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/memory.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/memory.texi |   24 ++++++++++++------------
 1 file changed, 12 insertions(+), 12 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/memory.texi b/manual/memory.texi
index a3ecc0d..59b04b9 100644
--- a/manual/memory.texi
+++ b/manual/memory.texi
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@ grows, but doesn't shrink when the stack shrinks.
 
 This section covers how ordinary programs manage storage for their data,
 including the famous @code{malloc} function and some fancier facilities
-special @theglibc{} and GNU Compiler.
+special to @theglibc{} and GNU Compiler.
 
 @menu
 * Memory Allocation and C::     How to get different kinds of allocation in C.
@@ -997,7 +997,7 @@ The @code{memalign} function returns a null pointer on error and sets
 There was insufficient memory available to satisfy the request.
 
 @item EINVAL
-@var{alignment} is not a power of two.
+@var{boundary} is not a power of two.
 
 @end table
 
@@ -1066,7 +1066,7 @@ systems that do not support @w{ISO C11}.
 @c  _int_memalign dup @acsfd @acsmem
 @c  mutex_unlock dup @aculock
 Using @code{valloc} is like using @code{memalign} and passing the page size
-as the value of the second argument.  It is implemented like this:
+as the value of the first argument.  It is implemented like this:
 
 @smallexample
 void *
@@ -1628,7 +1628,7 @@ Return information about the current dynamic memory usage.
 
 A complicated task when programming with languages which do not use
 garbage collected dynamic memory allocation is to find memory leaks.
-Long running programs must assure that dynamically allocated objects are
+Long running programs must ensure that dynamically allocated objects are
 freed at the end of their lifetime.  If this does not happen the system
 runs out of memory, sooner or later.
 
@@ -1729,7 +1729,7 @@ main (int argc, char *argv[])
 @}
 @end example
 
-This is all what is needed if you want to trace the calls during the
+This is all that is needed if you want to trace the calls during the
 whole runtime of the program.  Alternatively you can stop the tracing at
 any time with a call to @code{muntrace}.  It is even possible to restart
 the tracing again with a new call to @code{mtrace}.  But this can cause
@@ -1738,8 +1738,8 @@ not called.  Please note that not only the application uses the traced
 functions, also libraries (including the C library itself) use these
 functions.
 
-This last point is also why it is no good idea to call @code{muntrace}
-before the program terminated.  The libraries are informed about the
+This last point is also why it is not a good idea to call @code{muntrace}
+before the program terminates.  The libraries are informed about the
 termination of the program only after the program returns from
 @code{main} or calls @code{exit} and so cannot free the memory they use
 before this time.
@@ -2167,7 +2167,7 @@ in the same obstack.
 If @var{object} is a null pointer, everything allocated in the obstack
 is freed.  Otherwise, @var{object} must be the address of an object
 allocated in the obstack.  Then @var{object} is freed, along with
-everything allocated in @var{obstack} since @var{object}.
+everything allocated in @var{obstack-ptr} since @var{object}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 Note that if @var{object} is a null pointer, the result is an
@@ -2412,7 +2412,7 @@ in the current chunk.  It is declared as follows:
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{@mtsrace{:obstack-ptr}}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
 This returns the number of bytes that can be added safely to the current
 growing object (or to an object about to be started) in obstack
-@var{obstack} using the fast growth functions.
+@var{obstack-ptr} using the fast growth functions.
 @end deftypefun
 
 While you know there is room, you can use these fast growth functions
@@ -2822,7 +2822,7 @@ open-coded by the GNU C compiler.)
 
 @item
 Since @code{alloca} does not have separate pools for different sizes of
-block, space used for any size block can be reused for any other size.
+blocks, space used for any size block can be reused for any other size.
 @code{alloca} does not cause memory fragmentation.
 
 @item
@@ -2941,7 +2941,7 @@ The address of the end of a segment is defined to be the address of the
 last byte in the segment plus 1.
 
 The function has no effect if @var{addr} is lower than the low end of
-the data segment.  (This is considered success, by the way).
+the data segment.  (This is considered success, by the way.)
 
 The function fails if it would cause the data segment to overlap another
 segment or exceed the process' data storage limit (@pxref{Limits on
@@ -3263,7 +3263,7 @@ with @code{munlockall} and @code{munlock}.
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
 
 @code{munlockall} unlocks every page in the calling process' virtual
-address space and turn off @code{MCL_FUTURE} future locking mode.
+address space and turns off @code{MCL_FUTURE} future locking mode.
 
 The return value is zero if the function succeeds.  Otherwise, it is
 @code{-1} and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The only way this
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[PATCH 08/37] Manual typos: Message Translation

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/message.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/message.texi |  159 +++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------
 1 file changed, 79 insertions(+), 80 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/message.texi b/manual/message.texi
index b03a14a..e48ed61 100644
--- a/manual/message.texi
+++ b/manual/message.texi
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ functions is defined in the X/Open standard but this is derived from
 industry decisions and therefore not necessarily based on reasonable
 decisions.
 
-As mentioned above the message catalog handling provides easy
+As mentioned above, the message catalog handling provides easy
 extendibility by using external data files which contain the message
 translations.  I.e., these files contain for each of the messages used
 in the program a translation for the appropriate language.  So the tasks
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ identifier is used.
 
 This means for the author of the program that s/he will have to make
 sure the meaning of the identifier in the program code and in the
-message catalogs are always the same.
+message catalogs is always the same.
 
 Before a message can be translated the catalog file must be located.
 The user of the program must be able to guide the responsible function
@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@ are defined/declared in the @file{nl_types.h} header file.
 @c   munmap ok
 @c   close_not_cancel_no_status ok
 @c  free @ascuheap @acsmem
-The @code{catopen} function tries to locate the message data file names
+The @code{catopen} function tries to locate the message data file named
 @var{cat_name} and loads it when found.  The return value is of an
 opaque type and can be used in calls to the other functions to refer to
 this loaded catalog.
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ the name of the currently selected locale.  See the explanation of the
 format above.
 
 @item %%
-Since @code{%} is used in a meta character there must be a way to
+Since @code{%} is used as a meta character there must be a way to
 express the @code{%} character in the result itself.  Using @code{%%}
 does this just like it works for @code{printf}.
 @end table
@@ -215,11 +215,11 @@ Otherwise the values of environment variables from the standard
 environment are examined (@pxref{Standard Environment}).  Which
 variables are examined is decided by the @var{flag} parameter of
 @code{catopen}.  If the value is @code{NL_CAT_LOCALE} (which is defined
-in @file{nl_types.h}) then the @code{catopen} function use the name of
+in @file{nl_types.h}) then the @code{catopen} function uses the name of
 the locale currently selected for the @code{LC_MESSAGES} category.
 
 If @var{flag} is zero the @code{LANG} environment variable is examined.
-This is a left-over from the early days where the concept of the locales
+This is a left-over from the early days when the concept of locales
 had not even reached the level of POSIX locales.
 
 The environment variable and the locale name should have a value of the
@@ -243,7 +243,7 @@ translation actually happened must look like this:
 @end smallexample
 
 @noindent
-When an error occurred the global variable @var{errno} is set to
+When an error occurs the global variable @var{errno} is set to
 
 @table @var
 @item EBADF
@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ variables.
 
 @deftypefun {char *} catgets (nl_catd @var{catalog_desc}, int @var{set}, int @var{message}, const char *@var{string})
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
-The function @code{catgets} has to be used to access the massage catalog
+The function @code{catgets} has to be used to access the message catalog
 previously opened using the @code{catopen} function.  The
 @var{catalog_desc} parameter must be a value previously returned by
 @code{catopen}.
@@ -277,11 +277,11 @@ previously opened using the @code{catopen} function.  The
 The next two parameters, @var{set} and @var{message}, reflect the
 internal organization of the message catalog files.  This will be
 explained in detail below.  For now it is interesting to know that a
-catalog can consists of several set and the messages in each thread are
+catalog can consist of several sets and the messages in each thread are
 individually numbered using numbers.  Neither the set number nor the
 message number must be consecutive.  They can be arbitrarily chosen.
 But each message (unless equal to another one) must have its own unique
-pair of set and message number.
+pair of set and message numbers.
 
 Since it is not guaranteed that the message catalog for the language
 selected by the user exists the last parameter @var{string} helps to
@@ -303,7 +303,7 @@ functions if no supporting functionality is available.  Since each
 set/message number tuple must be unique the programmer must keep lists
 of the messages at the same time the code is written.  And the work
 between several people working on the same project must be coordinated.
-We will see some how these problems can be relaxed a bit (@pxref{Common
+We will see how some of these problems can be relaxed a bit (@pxref{Common
 Usage}).
 
 @deftypefun int catclose (nl_catd @var{catalog_desc})
@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@ Usage}).
 The @code{catclose} function can be used to free the resources
 associated with a message catalog which previously was opened by a call
 to @code{catopen}.  If the resources can be successfully freed the
-function returns @code{0}.  Otherwise it return @code{@minus{}1} and the
+function returns @code{0}.  Otherwise it returns @code{@minus{}1} and the
 global variable @var{errno} is set.  Errors can occur if the catalog
 descriptor @var{catalog_desc} is not valid in which case @var{errno} is
 set to @code{EBADF}.
@@ -325,7 +325,7 @@ set to @code{EBADF}.
 @node The message catalog files
 @subsection  Format of the message catalog files
 
-The only reasonable way the translate all the messages of a function and
+The only reasonable way to translate all the messages of a function and
 store the result in a message catalog file which can be read by the
 @code{catopen} function is to write all the message text to the
 translator and let her/him translate them all.  I.e., we must have a
@@ -386,9 +386,9 @@ messages will appear in the output.
 @item
 If a line contains after leading whitespaces the sequence
 @code{$quote}, the quoting character used for this input file is
-changed to the first non-whitespace character following the
+changed to the first non-whitespace character following
 @code{$quote}.  If no non-whitespace character is present before the
-line ends quoting is disable.
+line ends quoting is disabled.
 
 By default no quoting character is used.  In this mode strings are
 terminated with the first unescaped line break.  If there is a
@@ -411,7 +411,7 @@ If the start of the line is a number the message number is obvious.  It
 is an error if the same message number already appeared for this set.
 
 If the leading token was an identifier the message number gets
-automatically assigned.  The value is the current maximum messages
+automatically assigned.  The value is the current maximum message
 number for this set plus one.  It is an error if the identifier was
 already used for a message in this set.  It is OK to reuse the
 identifier for a message in another thread.  How to use the symbolic
@@ -451,17 +451,17 @@ Lines 1 and 9 are comments since they start with @code{$} followed by
 a whitespace.
 @item
 The quoting character is set to @code{"}.  Otherwise the quotes in the
-message definition would have to be left away and in this case the
-message with the identifier @code{two} would loose its leading whitespace.
+message definition would have to be omitted and in this case the
+message with the identifier @code{two} would lose its leading whitespace.
 @item
-Mixing numbered messages with message having symbolic names is no
+Mixing numbered messages with messages having symbolic names is no
 problem and the numbering happens automatically.
 @end itemize
 
 
 While this file format is pretty easy it is not the best possible for
 use in a running program.  The @code{catopen} function would have to
-parser the file and handle syntactic errors gracefully.  This is not so
+parse the file and handle syntactic errors gracefully.  This is not so
 easy and the whole process is pretty slow.  Therefore the @code{catgets}
 functions expect the data in another more compact and ready-to-use file
 format.  There is a special program @code{gencat} which is explained in
@@ -492,18 +492,18 @@ implemented which help to work in a more reasonable way with the
 The @code{gencat} program can be invoked in two ways:
 
 @example
-`gencat [@var{Option}]@dots{} [@var{Output-File} [@var{Input-File}]@dots{}]`
+`gencat [@var{Option} @dots{}] [@var{Output-File} [@var{Input-File} @dots{}]]`
 @end example
 
 This is the interface defined in the X/Open standard.  If no
-@var{Input-File} parameter is given input will be read from standard
-input.  Multiple input files will be read as if they are concatenated.
+@var{Input-File} parameter is given, input will be read from standard
+input.  Multiple input files will be read as if they were concatenated.
 If @var{Output-File} is also missing, the output will be written to
 standard output.  To provide the interface one is used to from other
 programs a second interface is provided.
 
 @smallexample
-`gencat [@var{Option}]@dots{} -o @var{Output-File} [@var{Input-File}]@dots{}`
+`gencat [@var{Option} @dots{}] -o @var{Output-File} [@var{Input-File} @dots{}]`
 @end smallexample
 
 The option @samp{-o} is used to specify the output file and all file
@@ -516,17 +516,17 @@ standard output.  Using @file{-} as a file name is allowed in X/Open
 while using the device names is a GNU extension.
 
 The @code{gencat} program works by concatenating all input files and
-then @strong{merge} the resulting collection of message sets with a
+then @strong{merging} the resulting collection of message sets with a
 possibly existing output file.  This is done by removing all messages
 with set/message number tuples matching any of the generated messages
 from the output file and then adding all the new messages.  To
 regenerate a catalog file while ignoring the old contents therefore
-requires to remove the output file if it exists.  If the output is
+requires removing the output file if it exists.  If the output is
 written to standard output no merging takes place.
 
 @noindent
 The following table shows the options understood by the @code{gencat}
-program.  The X/Open standard does not specify any option for the
+program.  The X/Open standard does not specify any options for the
 program so all of these are GNU extensions.
 
 @table @samp
@@ -537,8 +537,8 @@ Print the version information and exit.
 @itemx --help
 Print a usage message listing all available options, then exit successfully.
 @item --new
-Do never merge the new messages from the input files with the old content
-of the output files.  The old content of the output file is discarded.
+Do not merge the new messages from the input files with the old content
+of the output file.  The old content of the output file is discarded.
 @item -H
 @itemx --header=name
 This option is used to emit the symbolic names given to sets and
@@ -608,7 +608,7 @@ The problems mentioned in the last section derive from the fact that:
 the numbers are allocated once and due to the possibly frequent use of
 them it is difficult to change a number later.
 @item
-the numbers do not allow to guess anything about the string and
+the numbers do not allow guessing anything about the string and
 therefore collisions can easily happen.
 @end enumerate
 
@@ -622,7 +622,7 @@ This is necessary since the symbolic names must be mapped to numbers
 before the program sources can be compiled.  In the last section it was
 described how to generate a header containing the mapping of the names.
 E.g., for the example message file given in the last section we could
-call the @code{gencat} program as follow (assume @file{ex.msg} contains
+call the @code{gencat} program as follows (assume @file{ex.msg} contains
 the sources).
 
 @smallexample
@@ -646,8 +646,7 @@ allow to predict the content of the header file (it is deterministic)
 but this is not necessary.  The @code{gencat} program can take care for
 everything.  All the programmer has to do is to put the generated header
 file in the dependency list of the source files of her/his project and
-to add a rules to regenerate the header of any of the input files
-change.
+add a rule to regenerate the header if any of the input files change.
 
 One word about the symbol mangling.  Every symbol consists of two parts:
 the name of the message set plus the name of the message or the special
@@ -816,7 +815,7 @@ If the string which has to be translated is the only argument this of
 course means the string itself is the key.  I.e., the translation will
 be selected based on the original string.  The message catalogs must
 therefore contain the original strings plus one translation for any such
-string.  The task of the @code{gettext} function is it to compare the
+string.  The task of the @code{gettext} function is to compare the
 argument string with the available strings in the catalog and return the
 appropriate translation.  Of course this process is optimized so that
 this process is not more expensive than an access using an atomic key
@@ -864,11 +863,11 @@ processing the @code{%m} format element and if the @code{gettext}
 function would change this value (it is called before @code{printf} is
 called) we would get a wrong message.
 
-So there is no easy way to detect a missing message catalog beside
+So there is no easy way to detect a missing message catalog besides
 comparing the argument string with the result.  But it is normally the
 task of the user to react on missing catalogs.  The program cannot guess
 when a message catalog is really necessary since for a user who speaks
-the language the program was developed in does not need any translation.
+the language the program was developed in, the message does not need any translation.
 @end deftypefun
 
 The remaining two functions to access the message catalog add some
@@ -885,7 +884,7 @@ information.
 @deftypefun {char *} dgettext (const char *@var{domainname}, const char *@var{msgid})
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{@mtsenv{}}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{} @asulock{} @ascudlopen{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
 @c Wrapper for dcgettext.
-The @code{dgettext} functions acts just like the @code{gettext}
+The @code{dgettext} function acts just like the @code{gettext}
 function.  It only takes an additional first argument @var{domainname}
 which guides the selection of the message catalogs which are searched
 for the translation.  If the @var{domainname} parameter is the null
@@ -1021,12 +1020,12 @@ has to use the available selectors for the categories available in
 @code{LC_COLLATE}, @code{LC_MESSAGES}, @code{LC_MONETARY},
 @code{LC_NUMERIC}, and @code{LC_TIME}.  Please note that @code{LC_ALL}
 must not be used and even though the names might suggest this, there is
-no relation to the environments variables of this name.
+no relation to the environment variable of this name.
 
 The @code{dcgettext} function is only implemented for compatibility with
 other systems which have @code{gettext} functions.  There is not really
 any situation where it is necessary (or useful) to use a different value
-but @code{LC_MESSAGES} in for the @var{category} parameter.  We are
+than @code{LC_MESSAGES} for the @var{category} parameter.  We are
 dealing with messages here and any other choice can only be irritating.
 
 As for @code{gettext} the return value type is @code{char *} which is an
@@ -1034,7 +1033,7 @@ anachronism.  The returned string must never be modified.
 @end deftypefun
 
 When using the three functions above in a program it is a frequent case
-that the @var{msgid} argument is a constant string.  So it is worth to
+that the @var{msgid} argument is a constant string.  So it is worthwhile to
 optimize this case.  Thinking shortly about this one will realize that
 as long as no new message catalog is loaded the translation of a message
 will not change.  This optimization is actually implemented by the
@@ -1058,10 +1057,10 @@ performed by the @code{catgets} functions:
 @enumerate
 @item
 Locate the set of message catalogs.  There are a number of files for
-different languages and which all belong to the package.  Usually they
+different languages which all belong to the package.  Usually they
 are all stored in the filesystem below a certain directory.
 
-There can be arbitrary many packages installed and they can follow
+There can be arbitrarily many packages installed and they can follow
 different guidelines for the placement of their files.
 
 @item
@@ -1079,7 +1078,7 @@ able to do.  But there are some problems unresolved:
 @item
 The language to be used can be specified in several different ways.
 There is no generally accepted standard for this and the user always
-expects the program understand what s/he means.  E.g., to select the
+expects the program to understand what s/he means.  E.g., to select the
 German translation one could write @code{de}, @code{german}, or
 @code{deutsch} and the program should always react the same.
 
@@ -1108,8 +1107,8 @@ be based on this.
 
 As the functions described in the last sections already mention separate
 sets of messages can be selected by a @dfn{domain name}.  This is a
-simple string which should be unique for each program part with uses a
-separate domain.  It is possible to use in one program arbitrary many
+simple string which should be unique for each program part that uses a
+separate domain.  It is possible to use in one program arbitrarily many
 domains at the same time.  E.g., @theglibc{} itself uses a domain
 named @code{libc} while the program using the C Library could use a
 domain named @code{foo}.  The important point is that at any time
@@ -1171,7 +1170,7 @@ different languages.  To be correct, this is the directory where the
 hierarchy of directories is expected.  Details are explained below.
 
 For the programmer it is important to note that the translations which
-come with the program have be placed in a directory hierarchy starting
+come with the program have to be placed in a directory hierarchy starting
 at, say, @file{/foo/bar}.  Then the program should make a
 @code{bindtextdomain} call to bind the domain for the current program to
 this directory.  So it is made sure the catalogs are found.  A correctly
@@ -1206,7 +1205,7 @@ variable @var{errno} is set accordingly.
 
 The functions of the @code{gettext} family described so far (and all the
 @code{catgets} functions as well) have one problem in the real world
-which have been neglected completely in all existing approaches.  What
+which has been neglected completely in all existing approaches.  What
 is meant here is the handling of plural forms.
 
 Looking through Unix source code before the time anybody thought about
@@ -1233,7 +1232,7 @@ tries to solve the problem correctly looked like this:
 But this does not solve the problem.  It helps languages where the
 plural form of a noun is not simply constructed by adding an `s' but
 that is all.  Once again people fell into the trap of believing the
-rules their language is using are universal.  But the handling of plural
+rules their language uses are universal.  But the handling of plural
 forms differs widely between the language families.  There are two
 things we can differ between (and even inside language families);
 
@@ -1266,15 +1265,15 @@ can select using rules specified by the translator the right plural
 form.  The two string arguments then will be used to provide a return
 value in case no message catalog is found (similar to the normal
 @code{gettext} behavior).  In this case the rules for Germanic language
-is used and it is assumed that the first string argument is the singular
+are used and it is assumed that the first string argument is the singular
 form, the second the plural form.
 
 This has the consequence that programs without language catalogs can
 display the correct strings only if the program itself is written using
 a Germanic language.  This is a limitation but since @theglibc{}
-(as well as the GNU @code{gettext} package) are written as part of the
-GNU package and the coding standards for the GNU project require program
-being written in English, this solution nevertheless fulfills its
+(as well as the GNU @code{gettext} package) is written as part of the
+GNU package and the coding standards for the GNU project require programs
+to be written in English, this solution nevertheless fulfills its
 purpose.
 
 @comment libintl.h
@@ -1291,7 +1290,7 @@ The parameter @var{n} is used to determine the plural form.  If no
 message catalog is found @var{msgid1} is returned if @code{n == 1},
 otherwise @code{msgid2}.
 
-An example for the us of this function is:
+An example for the use of this function is:
 
 @smallexample
   printf (ngettext ("%d file removed", "%d files removed", n), n);
@@ -1309,7 +1308,7 @@ Please note that the numeric value @var{n} has to be passed to the
 @c Wrapper for dcngettext.
 The @code{dngettext} is similar to the @code{dgettext} function in the
 way the message catalog is selected.  The difference is that it takes
-two extra parameter to provide the correct plural form.  These two
+two extra parameters to provide the correct plural form.  These two
 parameters are handled in the same way @code{ngettext} handles them.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -1320,7 +1319,7 @@ parameters are handled in the same way @code{ngettext} handles them.
 @c Wrapper for dcigettext.
 The @code{dcngettext} is similar to the @code{dcgettext} function in the
 way the message catalog is selected.  The difference is that it takes
-two extra parameter to provide the correct plural form.  These two
+two extra parameters to provide the correct plural form.  These two
 parameters are handled in the same way @code{ngettext} handles them.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -1342,7 +1341,7 @@ details are explained in the GNU @code{gettext} manual.  Here only a
 bit of information is provided.
 
 The information about the plural form selection has to be stored in the
-header entry (the one with the empty (@code{msgid} string).  It looks
+header entry (the one with the empty @code{msgid} string).  It looks
 like this:
 
 @smallexample
@@ -1351,8 +1350,8 @@ Plural-Forms: nplurals=2; plural=n == 1 ? 0 : 1;
 
 The @code{nplurals} value must be a decimal number which specifies how
 many different plural forms exist for this language.  The string
-following @code{plural} is an expression which is using the C language
-syntax.  Exceptions are that no negative number are allowed, numbers
+following @code{plural} is an expression using the C language
+syntax.  Exceptions are that no negative numbers are allowed, numbers
 must be decimal, and the only variable allowed is @code{n}.  This
 expression will be evaluated whenever one of the functions
 @code{ngettext}, @code{dngettext}, or @code{dcngettext} is called.  The
@@ -1392,7 +1391,7 @@ Turkish
 
 @item Two forms, singular used for one only
 This is the form used in most existing programs since it is what English
-is using.  A header entry would look like this:
+uses.  A header entry would look like this:
 
 @smallexample
 Plural-Forms: nplurals=2; plural=n != 1;
@@ -1551,7 +1550,7 @@ Slovenian
 @node Charset conversion in gettext
 @subsubsection How to specify the output character set @code{gettext} uses
 
-@code{gettext} not only looks up a translation in a message catalog.  It
+@code{gettext} not only looks up a translation in a message catalog, it
 also converts the translation on the fly to the desired output character
 set.  This is useful if the user is working in a different character set
 than the translator who created the message catalog, because it avoids
@@ -1642,10 +1641,10 @@ are in the dilemma described above.
 One solution to this problem is to artificially enlengthen the strings
 to make them unambiguous.  But what would the program do if no
 translation is available?  The enlengthened string is not what should be
-printed.  So we should use a little bit modified version of the functions.
+printed.  So we should use a slightly modified version of the functions.
 
 To enlengthen the strings a uniform method should be used.  E.g., in the
-example above the strings could be chosen as
+example above, the strings could be chosen as
 
 @smallexample
 Menu|File
@@ -1728,7 +1727,7 @@ why the @file{iso646.h} file exists in @w{ISO C} programming environments).
 @end itemize
 
 There is only one more comment to make left.  The wrapper function above
-require that the translations strings are not enlengthened themselves.
+requires that the translation strings are not enlengthened themselves.
 This is only logical.  There is no need to disambiguate the strings
 (since they are never used as keys for a search) and one also saves
 quite some memory and disk space by doing this.
@@ -1745,7 +1744,7 @@ them.
 The POSIX locale model uses the environment variables @code{LC_COLLATE},
 @code{LC_CTYPE}, @code{LC_MESSAGES}, @code{LC_MONETARY}, @code{LC_NUMERIC},
 and @code{LC_TIME} to select the locale which is to be used.  This way
-the user can influence lots of functions.  As we mentioned above the
+the user can influence lots of functions.  As we mentioned above, the
 @code{gettext} functions also take advantage of this.
 
 To understand how this happens it is necessary to take a look at the
@@ -1796,7 +1795,7 @@ following variables in this order are examined:
 
 This looks very familiar.  With the exception of the @code{LANGUAGE}
 environment variable this is exactly the lookup order the
-@code{setlocale} function uses.  But why introducing the @code{LANGUAGE}
+@code{setlocale} function uses.  But why introduce the @code{LANGUAGE}
 variable?
 
 The reason is that the syntax of the values these variables can have is
@@ -1812,7 +1811,7 @@ exactly one specification of a locale the @code{LANGUAGE} variable's
 value can consist of a colon separated list of locale names.  The
 attentive reader will realize that this is the way we manage to
 implement one of our additional demands above: we want to be able to
-specify an ordered list of language.
+specify an ordered list of languages.
 
 Back to the constructed filename we have only one component missing.
 The @var{domain_name} part is the name which was either registered using
@@ -1823,7 +1822,7 @@ closely related to the program/package name.  E.g., for @theglibc{}
 the domain name is @code{libc}.
 
 @noindent
-A limit piece of example code should show how the programmer is supposed
+A limited piece of example code should show how the program is supposed
 to work:
 
 @smallexample
@@ -1846,7 +1845,7 @@ The @code{textdomain} call changes the default domain to
 the message catalogs for the domain @code{test-package} can be found
 below the directory @file{/usr/local/share/locale}.
 
-If now the user set in her/his environment the variable @code{LANGUAGE}
+If the user sets in her/his environment the variable @code{LANGUAGE}
 to @code{de} the @code{gettext} function will try to use the
 translations from the file
 
@@ -1858,7 +1857,7 @@ From the above descriptions it should be clear which component of this
 filename is determined by which source.
 
-In the above example we assumed that the @code{LANGUAGE} environment
-variable to @code{de}.  This might be an appropriate selection but what
+In the above example we assumed the @code{LANGUAGE} environment
+variable to be @code{de}.  This might be an appropriate selection but what
 happens if the user wants to use @code{LC_ALL} because of the wider
 usability and here the required value is @code{de_DE.ISO-8859-1}?  We
 already mentioned above that a situation like this is not infrequent.
@@ -1876,7 +1875,7 @@ specification:
 
 @code{language[_territory[.codeset]][@@modifier]}
 
-Less specific locale names will be stripped of in the order of the
+Less specific locale names will be stripped in the order of the
 following list:
 
 @enumerate
@@ -1893,8 +1892,8 @@ following list:
 The @code{language} field will never be dropped for obvious reasons.
 
 The only new thing is the @code{normalized codeset} entry.  This is
-another goodie which is introduced to help reducing the chaos which
-derives from the inability of the people to standardize the names of
+another goodie which is introduced to help reduce the chaos which
+derives from the inability of people to standardize the names of
 character sets.  Instead of @w{ISO-8859-1} one can often see @w{8859-1},
 @w{88591}, @w{iso8859-1}, or @w{iso_8859-1}.  The @code{normalized
 codeset} value is generated from the user-provided character set name by
@@ -1902,7 +1901,7 @@ applying the following rules:
 
 @enumerate
 @item
-Remove all characters beside numbers and letters.
+Remove all characters besides numbers and letters.
 @item
 Fold letters to lowercase.
 @item
@@ -1910,8 +1909,8 @@ If the same only contains digits prepend the string @code{"iso"}.
 @end enumerate
 
 @noindent
-So all of the above name will be normalized to @code{iso88591}.  This
-allows the program user much more freely choosing the locale name.
+So all of the above names will be normalized to @code{iso88591}.  This
+allows the program user much more freedom in choosing the locale name.
 
 Even this extended functionality still does not help to solve the
 problem that completely different names can be used to denote the same
@@ -1924,7 +1923,7 @@ whatever prefix you used for configuring the C library) contains a
 mapping of alternative names to more regular names.  The system manager
 is free to add new entries to fill her/his own needs.  The selected
 locale from the environment is compared with the entries in the first
-column of this file ignoring the case.  If they match the value of the
+column of this file ignoring the case.  If they match, the value of the
 second column is used instead for the further handling.
 
 In the description of the format of the environment variables we already
@@ -1932,7 +1931,7 @@ mentioned the character set as a factor in the selection of the message
 catalog.  In fact, only catalogs which contain text written using the
 character set of the system/program can be used (directly; there will
 come a solution for this some day).  This means for the user that s/he
-will always have to take care for this.  If in the collection of the
+will always have to take care of this.  If in the collection of the
 message catalogs there are files for the same language but coded using
 different character sets the user has to be careful.
 
@@ -1965,6 +1964,6 @@ Other programs help to manage the development cycle when new messages appear
 in the source files or when a new translation of the messages appears.
 Here it should only be noted that using all the tools in GNU gettext it
 is possible to @emph{completely} automate the handling of message
-catalogs.  Beside marking the translatable strings in the source code and
+catalogs.  Besides marking the translatable strings in the source code and
 generating the translations the developers do not have anything to do
 themselves.
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[PATCH 22/37] Manual typos: Signal Handling

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/signal.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/signal.texi |    6 +++---
 1 file changed, 3 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/signal.texi b/manual/signal.texi
index 77f3d7c..79e190d 100644
--- a/manual/signal.texi
+++ b/manual/signal.texi
@@ -1207,7 +1207,7 @@ the signal.  These are described in more detail in @ref{Flags for Sigaction}.
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
 The @var{action} argument is used to set up a new action for the signal
 @var{signum}, while the @var{old-action} argument is used to return
-information about the action previously associated with this symbol.
+information about the action previously associated with this signal.
 (In other words, @var{old-action} has the same purpose as the
 @code{signal} function's return value---you can check to see what the
 old action in effect for the signal was, and restore it later if you
@@ -2092,7 +2092,7 @@ it can also handle a signal in the middle of clearing the flag.  (This
 is an example of the sort of reasoning you need to do to figure out
 whether non-atomic usage is safe.)
 
-Sometimes you can insure uninterrupted access to one object by
+Sometimes you can ensure uninterrupted access to one object by
 protecting its use with another object, perhaps one whose type
 guarantees atomicity.  @xref{Merged Signals}, for an example.
 
@@ -3371,7 +3371,7 @@ signals.  The return value is the previous set of blocked signals.
 @c The exception are BSD systems other than 4.4, where it is a syscall.
 @c sigsetmask @asulock/hurd @aculock/hurd
 @c  sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK) dup @asulock/hurd @aculock/hurd [no @mtasurace:sigprocmask/bsd(SIG_UNBLOCK)]
-This function equivalent to @code{sigprocmask} (@pxref{Process
+This function is equivalent to @code{sigprocmask} (@pxref{Process
 Signal Mask}) with a @var{how} argument of @code{SIG_SETMASK}: it sets
 the calling process's signal mask to @var{mask}.  The return value is
 the previous set of blocked signals.
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[PATCH 21/37] Manual typos: Non-Local Exits

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/setjmp.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/setjmp.texi |    8 ++++----
 1 file changed, 4 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/setjmp.texi b/manual/setjmp.texi
index ec79c26..94d16be 100644
--- a/manual/setjmp.texi
+++ b/manual/setjmp.texi
@@ -243,9 +243,9 @@ blocked signals.
 
 The Unix standard provides one more set of functions to control the
 execution path and these functions are more powerful than those
-discussed in this chapter so far.  These function were part of the
+discussed in this chapter so far.  These functions were part of the
 original @w{System V} API and by this route were added to the Unix
-API.  Beside on branded Unix implementations these interfaces are not
+API.  Besides on branded Unix implementations these interfaces are not
 widely available.  Not all platforms and/or architectures @theglibc{}
 is available on provide this interface.  Use @file{configure} to
 detect the availability.
@@ -350,7 +350,7 @@ heap memory are normally not tagged to allow this.  The result is that
 programs would fail.  Examples for such code include the calling
 sequences the GNU C compiler generates for calls to nested functions.
 Safe ways to allocate stacks correctly include using memory on the
-original threads stack or explicitly allocate memory tagged for
+original thread's stack or explicitly allocating memory tagged for
 execution using (@pxref{Memory-mapped I/O}).
 
 @strong{Compatibility note}: The current Unix standard is very imprecise
@@ -360,7 +360,7 @@ the elements of the @code{stack_t} value are unclear.  @Theglibc{}
 and most other Unix implementations require the @code{ss_sp} value of
 the @code{uc_stack} element to point to the base of the memory region
 allocated for the stack and the size of the memory region is stored in
-@code{ss_size}.  There are implements out there which require
+@code{ss_size}.  There are implementations out there which require
 @code{ss_sp} to be set to the value the stack pointer will have (which
 can, depending on the direction the stack grows, be different).  This
 difference makes the @code{makecontext} function hard to use and it
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[PATCH 20/37] Manual typos: Resource Usage and Limitation

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/resource.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/resource.texi |   52 +++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------
 1 file changed, 26 insertions(+), 26 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/resource.texi b/manual/resource.texi
index e68458b..75e3a1b 100644
--- a/manual/resource.texi
+++ b/manual/resource.texi
@@ -452,7 +452,7 @@ above do.  The functions above are better choices.
 
 @code{ulimit} gets the current limit or sets the current and maximum
 limit for a particular resource for the calling process according to the
-command @var{cmd}.a
+command @var{cmd}.
 
 If you are getting a limit, the command argument is the only argument.
 If you are setting a limit, there is a second argument:
@@ -652,7 +652,7 @@ instructions for your process.
 Similarly, a page fault causes what looks like a straightforward
 sequence of instructions to take a long time.  The fact that other
 processes get to run while the page faults in is of no consequence,
-because as soon as the I/O is complete, the high priority process will
+because as soon as the I/O is complete, the higher priority process will
 kick them out and run again, but the wait for the I/O itself could be a
 problem.  To neutralize this threat, use @code{mlock} or
 @code{mlockall}.
@@ -668,7 +668,7 @@ order to run.  The errant program is in complete control.  It controls
 the vertical, it controls the horizontal.
 
 There are two ways to avoid this: 1) keep a shell running somewhere with
-a higher absolute priority.  2) keep a controlling terminal attached to
+a higher absolute priority or 2) keep a controlling terminal attached to
 the high priority process group.  All the priority in the world won't
 stop an interrupt handler from running and delivering a signal to the
 process if you hit Control-C.
@@ -733,7 +733,7 @@ between Round Robin and First Come First Served.
 
 To understand how scheduling works when processes of different scheduling
 policies occupy the same absolute priority, you have to know the nitty
-gritty details of how processes enter and exit the ready to run list:
+gritty details of how processes enter and exit the ready to run list.
 
 In both cases, the ready to run list is organized as a true queue, where
 a process gets pushed onto the tail when it becomes ready to run and is
@@ -931,7 +931,7 @@ you want to know.
 absolute priority of the process.
 
 On success, the return value is @code{0}.  Otherwise, it is @code{-1}
-and @code{ERRNO} is set accordingly.  The @code{errno} values specific
+and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The @code{errno} values specific
 to this function are:
 
 @table @code
@@ -1067,7 +1067,7 @@ among the great unwashed processes gets them.
 @subsubsection Introduction To Traditional Scheduling
 
 Long before there was absolute priority (See @ref{Absolute Priority}),
-Unix systems were scheduling the CPU using this system.  When Posix came
+Unix systems were scheduling the CPU using this system.  When POSIX came
 in like the Romans and imposed absolute priorities to accommodate the
 needs of realtime processing, it left the indigenous Absolute Priority
 Zero processes to govern themselves by their own familiar scheduling
@@ -1095,7 +1095,7 @@ The dynamic priority sometimes determines who gets the next turn on the
 CPU.  Sometimes it determines how long turns last.  Sometimes it
 determines whether a process can kick another off the CPU.
 
-In Linux, the value is a combination of these things, but mostly it is
+In Linux, the value is a combination of these things, but mostly it
 just determines the length of the time slice.  The higher a process'
 dynamic priority, the longer a shot it gets on the CPU when it gets one.
 If it doesn't use up its time slice before giving up the CPU to do
@@ -1124,7 +1124,7 @@ ability to refuse its equal share of CPU time that others might prosper.
 Hence, the higher a process' nice value, the nicer the process is.
 (Then a snake came along and offered some process a negative nice value
 and the system became the crass resource allocation system we know
-today).
+today.)
 
 Dynamic priorities tend upward and downward with an objective of
 smoothing out allocation of CPU time and giving quick response time to
@@ -1181,7 +1181,7 @@ have the same nice value, this returns the lowest value that any of them
 has.
 
 On success, the return value is @code{0}.  Otherwise, it is @code{-1}
-and @code{ERRNO} is set accordingly.  The @code{errno} values specific
+and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The @code{errno} values specific
 to this function are:
 
 @table @code
@@ -1306,7 +1306,7 @@ over this aspect of the system as well:
 @item
 One thread or process is responsible for absolutely critical work
 which under no circumstances must be interrupted or hindered from
-making process by other process or threads using CPU resources.  In
+making progress by other processes or threads using CPU resources.  In
 this case the special process would be confined to a CPU which no
 other process or thread is allowed to use.
 
@@ -1316,7 +1316,7 @@ from different CPUs.  This is the case in NUMA (Non-Uniform Memory
 Architecture) machines.  Preferably memory should be accessed locally
 but this requirement is usually not visible to the scheduler.
 Therefore forcing a process or thread to the CPUs which have local
-access to the mostly used memory helps to significantly boost the
+access to the most-used memory helps to significantly boost the
 performance.
 
 @item
@@ -1331,7 +1331,7 @@ problem.  The Linux kernel provides a set of interfaces to allow
 specifying @emph{affinity sets} for a process.  The scheduler will
 schedule the thread or process on CPUs specified by the affinity
 masks.  The interfaces which @theglibc{} define follow to some
-extend the Linux kernel interface.
+extent the Linux kernel interface.
 
 @comment sched.h
 @comment GNU
@@ -1345,7 +1345,7 @@ different interface has to be used.
 This type is a GNU extension and is defined in @file{sched.h}.
 @end deftp
 
-To manipulate the bitset, to set and reset bits, a number of macros is
+To manipulate the bitset, to set and reset bits, a number of macros are
 defined.  Some of the macros take a CPU number as a parameter.  Here
 it is important to never exceed the size of the bitset.  The following
 macro specifies the number of bits in the @code{cpu_set_t} bitset.
@@ -1432,7 +1432,7 @@ affinity mask can be retrieved from the system.
 @c Wrapped syscall to zero out past the kernel cpu set size; Linux
 @c only.
 
-This functions stores the CPU affinity mask for the process or thread
+This function stores the CPU affinity mask for the process or thread
 with the ID @var{pid} in the @var{cpusetsize} bytes long bitmap
 pointed to by @var{cpuset}.  If successful, the function always
 initializes all bits in the @code{cpu_set_t} object and returns zero.
@@ -1446,7 +1446,7 @@ and @code{errno} is set to represent the error condition.
 No process or thread with the given ID found.
 
 @item EFAULT
-The pointer @var{cpuset} is does not point to a valid object.
+The pointer @var{cpuset} does not point to a valid object.
 @end table
 
 This function is a GNU extension and is declared in @file{sched.h}.
@@ -1465,7 +1465,7 @@ interface must be provided for that.
 
 This function installs the @var{cpusetsize} bytes long affinity mask
 pointed to by @var{cpuset} for the process or thread with the ID @var{pid}.
-If successful the function returns zero and the scheduler will in future
+If successful the function returns zero and the scheduler will in the future
 take the affinity information into account.
 
 If the function fails it will return @code{-1} and @code{errno} is set
@@ -1476,7 +1476,7 @@ to the error code:
 No process or thread with the given ID found.
 
 @item EFAULT
-The pointer @var{cpuset} is does not point to a valid object.
+The pointer @var{cpuset} does not point to a valid object.
 
 @item EINVAL
 The bitset is not valid.  This might mean that the affinity set might
@@ -1518,7 +1518,7 @@ virtual addresses into physical addresses.  This is normally done by the
 hardware of the processor.
 
 @cindex shared memory
-Using a virtual address space has several advantage.  The most important
+Using a virtual address space has several advantages.  The most important
 is process isolation.  The different processes running on the system
 cannot interfere directly with each other.  No process can write into
 the address space of another process (except when shared memory is used
@@ -1548,16 +1548,16 @@ stores memory content externally it cannot do this on a byte-by-byte
 basis.  The administrative overhead does not allow this (leaving alone
 the processor hardware).  Instead several thousand bytes are handled
 together and form a @dfn{page}.  The size of each page is always a power
-of two byte.  The smallest page size in use today is 4096, with 8192,
+of two bytes.  The smallest page size in use today is 4096, with 8192,
 16384, and 65536 being other popular sizes.
 
 @node Query Memory Parameters
 @subsection How to get information about the memory subsystem?
 
 The page size of the virtual memory the process sees is essential to
-know in several situations.  Some programming interface (e.g.,
+know in several situations.  Some programming interfaces (e.g.,
 @code{mmap}, @pxref{Memory-mapped I/O}) require the user to provide
-information adjusted to the page size.  In the case of @code{mmap} is it
+information adjusted to the page size.  In the case of @code{mmap} it is
 necessary to provide a length argument which is a multiple of the page
 size.  Another place where the knowledge about the page size is useful
 is in memory allocation.  If one allocates pieces of memory in larger
@@ -1568,7 +1568,7 @@ of the page size the kernel's memory handling can work more effectively
 since it only has to allocate memory pages which are fully used.  (To do
 this optimization it is necessary to know a bit about the memory
 allocator which will require a bit of memory itself for each block and
-this overhead must not push the total size over the page size multiple.
+this overhead must not push the total size over the page size multiple.)
 
 The page size traditionally was a compile time constant.  But recent
 development of processors changed this.  Processors now support
@@ -1605,7 +1605,7 @@ information about the physical memory the system has.  The call
 @end smallexample
 
 @noindent
-returns the total number of pages of physical the system has.
+returns the total number of pages of physical memory the system has.
 This does not mean all this memory is available.  This information can
 be found using
 
@@ -1634,7 +1634,7 @@ get this information two functions.  They are declared in the file
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@asunsafe{@ascuheap{} @asulock{}}@acunsafe{@aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
 @c This fopens a /proc file and scans it for the requested information.
 The @code{get_phys_pages} function returns the total number of pages of
-physical the system has.  To get the amount of memory this number has to
+physical memory the system has.  To get the amount of memory this number has to
 be multiplied by the page size.
 
 This function is a GNU extension.
@@ -1645,7 +1645,7 @@ This function is a GNU extension.
 @deftypefun {long int} get_avphys_pages (void)
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@asunsafe{@ascuheap{} @asulock{}}@acunsafe{@aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
 The @code{get_avphys_pages} function returns the number of available pages of
-physical the system has.  To get the amount of memory this number has to
+physical memory the system has.  To get the amount of memory this number has to
 be multiplied by the page size.
 
 This function is a GNU extension.
@@ -1712,7 +1712,7 @@ This function is a GNU extension.
 Before starting more threads it should be checked whether the processors
 are not already overused.  Unix systems calculate something called the
 @dfn{load average}.  This is a number indicating how many processes were
-running.  This number is average over different periods of times
+running.  This number is an average over different periods of time
 (normally 1, 5, and 15 minutes).
 
 @comment stdlib.h
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[PATCH 33/37] Manual typos: Internal probes

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/probes.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/probes.texi |    4 ++--
 1 file changed, 2 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/probes.texi b/manual/probes.texi
index 7dd56d8..237a918 100644
--- a/manual/probes.texi
+++ b/manual/probes.texi
@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ This occurs within
 point to the same arena.  In this configuration, this will usually only
 occur once per thread.  The exception is when a thread first selected
 the main arena, but a subsequent allocation from it fails: then, and
-only then, may we switch to another arena to retry that allocations, and
+only then, may we switch to another arena to retry that allocation, and
 for further allocations within that thread.
 @end deftp
 
@@ -163,7 +163,7 @@ parameter.
 @end deftp
 
 @deftp Probe memory_mallopt_trim_threshold (int @var{$arg1}, int @var{$arg2}, int @var{$arg3})
-This probe is triggere shortly after the @code{memory_mallopt} probe,
+This probe is triggered shortly after the @code{memory_mallopt} probe,
 when the parameter to be changed is @code{M_TRIM_THRESHOLD}.  Argument
 @var{$arg1} is the requested value, @var{$arg2} is the previous value of
 this @code{malloc} parameter, and @var{$arg3} is nonzero if dynamic
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[PATCH 36/37] Manual typos: Library Maintenance

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/maint.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/maint.texi |    2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)


diff --git a/manual/maint.texi b/manual/maint.texi
index 862b49d..473ab16 100644
--- a/manual/maint.texi
+++ b/manual/maint.texi
@@ -152,7 +152,7 @@ functions should be called @file{sys/platform/@var{name}.h}.
 
 @item
 Each header file's name should include the platform name, to avoid
-users thinking there is anything in common between different the
+users thinking there is anything in common between the different
 header files for different platforms.  For example, a
 @file{sys/platform/@var{arch}.h} name such as
 @file{sys/platform/ppc.h} is better than @file{sys/platform.h}.
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[PATCH 29/37] Manual typos: System Configuration Parameters

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/conf.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/conf.texi |   10 +++++-----
 1 file changed, 5 insertions(+), 5 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/conf.texi b/manual/conf.texi
index 82a8766..78b7a4d 100644
--- a/manual/conf.texi
+++ b/manual/conf.texi
@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ should always be defined even if there is no specific imposed limit.
 POSIX defines certain system-specific options that not all POSIX systems
 support.  Since these options are provided in the kernel, not in the
 library, simply using @theglibc{} does not guarantee any of these
-features is supported; it depends on the system you are using.
+features are supported; it depends on the system you are using.
 
 @pindex unistd.h
 You can test for the availability of a given option using the macros in
@@ -466,7 +466,7 @@ Inquire about the parameter corresponding to @code{_POSIX_AIO_MAX}.
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
 @item _SC_AIO_PRIO_DELTA_MAX
-Inquire the value by which a process can decrease its asynchronous I/O
+Inquire about the value by which a process can decrease its asynchronous I/O
 priority level from its own scheduling priority.  This corresponds to the
 run-time invariant value @code{AIO_PRIO_DELTA_MAX}.
 
@@ -573,7 +573,7 @@ Inquire about the parameter corresponding to @code{_POSIX_PII_OSI_M}.
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1g
 @item _SC_T_IOV_MAX
-Inquire the value of the value associated with the @code{T_IOV_MAX}
+Inquire about the value associated with the @code{T_IOV_MAX}
 variable.
 
 @comment unistd.h
@@ -888,7 +888,7 @@ Inquire about the number of bits in a variable of a register word.
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment X/Open
 @item _SC_MB_LEN_MAX
-Inquire the maximum length of a multi-byte representation of a wide
+Inquire about the maximum length of a multi-byte representation of a wide
 character value.
 
 @comment unistd.h
@@ -1553,7 +1553,7 @@ the collating sequence for a locale.
 @comment limits.h
 @comment POSIX.2
 @deftypevr Macro int EXPR_NEST_MAX
-The maximum number of expressions that can be nested within parenthesis
+The maximum number of expressions that can be nested within parentheses
 by the @code{expr} utility.
 @end deftypevr
 
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[PATCH 37/37] Manual typos: Contributors to

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/contrib.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/contrib.texi |    6 +++---
 1 file changed, 3 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/contrib.texi b/manual/contrib.texi
index 930d614..19b015f 100644
--- a/manual/contrib.texi
+++ b/manual/contrib.texi
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ Ultrix 4 (@code{mips-dec-ultrix4}) and the port to the DEC Alpha
 running OSF/1 (@code{alpha-dec-osf1}).
 
 @item
-Mark Kettenis for implementing the @code{utmpx} interface and an utmp
+Mark Kettenis for implementing the @code{utmpx} interface and a utmp
 daemon, and for a Hesiod NSS module.
 
 @item
@@ -183,7 +183,7 @@ Jeff Law for various fixes.
 
 @item
 Doug Lea for contributing the memory allocation functions
-functions @code{malloc}, @code{realloc} and @code{free} and related
+@code{malloc}, @code{realloc} and @code{free} and related
 code.
 
 @item
@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ package by Arthur David Olson and his many contributors.
 
 @item
 Some of the support code for Mach is taken from Mach 3.0 by CMU;
-the file if_ppp.h is also copyright by CMU, but under a different license;
+the file @file{if_ppp.h} is also copyright by CMU, but under a different license;
 see the file @file{LICENSES} for the text of the licenses.
 
 @item
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[PATCH 25/37] Manual typos: Job Control

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/job.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/job.texi |    2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)


diff --git a/manual/job.texi b/manual/job.texi
index 095c26d..72b5599 100644
--- a/manual/job.texi
+++ b/manual/job.texi
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ for allowing the user to interactively continue stopped jobs and switch
 jobs between foreground and background.
 
 @xref{Access to the Terminal}, for more information about I/O to the
-controlling terminal,
+controlling terminal.
 
 @node Job Control is Optional, Controlling Terminal, Concepts of Job Control , Job Control
 @section Job Control is Optional
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[PATCH 26/37] Manual typos: System Databases and Name Service Switch

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/nss.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/nss.texi |   44 ++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------
 1 file changed, 22 insertions(+), 22 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/nss.texi b/manual/nss.texi
index 66dccef..fd479d4 100644
--- a/manual/nss.texi
+++ b/manual/nss.texi
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ Network Information Service (NIS) and the Domain Name Service (DNS))
 became popular, and were hacked into the C library, usually with a fixed
 search order.
 
-@Theglibc{} contains a cleaner solution of this problem.  It is
+@Theglibc{} contains a cleaner solution to this problem.  It is
 designed after a method used by Sun Microsystems in the C library of
 @w{Solaris 2}.  @Theglibc{} follows their name and calls this
 scheme @dfn{Name Service Switch} (NSS).
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ The modules can be updated separately.
 The C library image is smaller.
 @end enumerate
 
-To fulfill the first goal above the ABI of the modules will be described
+To fulfill the first goal above, the ABI of the modules will be described
 below.  For getting the implementation of a new service right it is
 important to understand how the functions in the modules get called.
 They are in no way designed to be used by the programmer directly.
@@ -106,7 +106,7 @@ There will be some more added later (@code{automount}, @code{bootparams},
 @cindex @file{nsswitch.conf}
 Somehow the NSS code must be told about the wishes of the user.  For
 this reason there is the file @file{/etc/nsswitch.conf}.  For each
-database this file contain a specification how the lookup process should
+database, this file contains a specification of how the lookup process should
 work.  The file could look like this:
 
 @example
@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ the reaction on lookup result like @code{[NOTFOUND=return]}.
 The above example file mentions five different services: @code{files},
 @code{db}, @code{dns}, @code{nis}, and @code{nisplus}.  This does not
 mean these
-services are available on all sites and it does also not mean these are
+services are available on all sites and neither does it mean these are
 all the services which will ever be available.
 
 In fact, these names are simply strings which the NSS code uses to find
@@ -279,8 +279,8 @@ and the default value for the three databases above is
 @code{compat [NOTFOUND=return] files}.
 
 For all other databases the default value is
-@code{nis [NOTFOUND=return] files}.  This solution give the best
-chance to be correct since NIS and file based lookup is used.
+@code{nis [NOTFOUND=return] files}.  This solution gives the best
+chance to be correct since NIS and file based lookups are used.
 
 @cindex optimizing NSS
 A second point is that the user should try to optimize the lookup
@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ interested in this topic should read about Dynamic Linking.
 @subsection The Naming Scheme of the NSS Modules
 
 @noindent
-The name of each function consist of various parts:
+The name of each function consists of various parts:
 
 @quotation
        _nss_@var{service}_@var{function}
@@ -349,7 +349,7 @@ functions.  I.e., if the user would call the @code{gethostbyname_r}
 function this also would end in the above function.  For all user
 interface functions the C library maps this call to a call to the
 reentrant function.  For reentrant functions this is trivial since the
-interface is (nearly) the same.  For the non-reentrant version The
+interface is (nearly) the same.  For the non-reentrant version the
 library keeps internal buffers which are used to replace the user
 supplied buffer.
 
@@ -379,7 +379,7 @@ not starting with @file{lib} but don't tell this to anybody.}
 Now we know about the functions contained in the modules.  It is now
 time to describe the types.  When we mentioned the reentrant versions of
 the functions above, this means there are some additional arguments
-(compared with the standard, non-reentrant version).  The prototypes for
+(compared with the standard, non-reentrant versions).  The prototypes for
 the non-reentrant and reentrant versions of our function above are:
 
 @smallexample
@@ -430,7 +430,7 @@ necessary the source code should be examined to learn about the details.
 
 In case the interface function has to return an error it is important
 that the correct error code is stored in @code{*@var{errnop}}.  Some
-return status value have only one associated error code, others have
+return status values have only one associated error code, others have
 more.
 
 @multitable @columnfractions .3 .2 .50
@@ -461,7 +461,7 @@ These are proposed values.  There can be other error codes and the
 described error codes can have different meaning.  @strong{With one
 exception:} when returning @code{NSS_STATUS_TRYAGAIN} the error code
 @code{ERANGE} @emph{must} mean that the user provided buffer is too
-small.  Everything is non-critical.
+small.  Everything else is non-critical.
 
 The above function has something special which is missing for almost all
 the other module functions.  There is an argument @var{h_errnop}.  This
@@ -609,7 +609,7 @@ This function simply closes all files which are still open or removes
 buffer caches.  If there are no files or buffers to remove this is again
 a simple noop.
 
-There normally is no return value different to @var{NSS_STATUS_SUCCESS}.
+There normally is no return value other than @var{NSS_STATUS_SUCCESS}.
 
 @item enum nss_status _nss_@var{database}_get@var{db}ent_r (@var{STRUCTURE} *result, char *buffer, size_t buflen, int *errnop)
 Since this function will be called several times in a row to retrieve
@@ -628,12 +628,12 @@ guaranteed that the same buffer will be passed for the next call of this
 function.  Therefore one must not misuse this buffer to save some state
 information from one call to another.
 
-Before the function returns the implementation should store the value of
-the local @var{errno} variable in the variable pointed to be
-@var{errnop}.  This is important to guarantee the module working in
+Before the function returns, the implementation should store the value of
+the local @var{errno} variable in the variable pointed to by
+@var{errnop}.  This is important to guarantee the module works in
 statically linked programs.
 
-As explained above this function could also have an additional last
+As explained above, this function could also have an additional last
 argument.  This depends on the database used; it happens only for
 @code{host} and @code{networks}.
 
@@ -642,7 +642,7 @@ more entries.  When the last entry was read it should return
 @code{NSS_STATUS_NOTFOUND}.  When the buffer given as an argument is too
 small for the data to be returned @code{NSS_STATUS_TRYAGAIN} should be
 returned.  When the service was not formerly initialized by a call to
-@code{_nss_@var{DATABASE}_set@var{db}ent} all return value allowed for
+@code{_nss_@var{DATABASE}_set@var{db}ent} all return values allowed for
 this function can also be returned here.
 
 @item enum nss_status _nss_@var{DATABASE}_get@var{db}by@var{XX}_r (@var{PARAMS}, @var{STRUCTURE} *result, char *buffer, size_t buflen, int *errnop)
@@ -653,17 +653,17 @@ interface functions.  All arguments given to the non-reentrant version
 are here described by @var{PARAMS}.
 
 The result must be stored in the structure pointed to by @var{result}.
-If there is additional data to return (say strings, where the
+If there are additional data to return (say strings, where the
 @var{result} structure only contains pointers) the function must use the
-@var{buffer} or length @var{buflen}.  There must not be any references
+@var{buffer} of length @var{buflen}.  There must not be any references
 to non-constant global data.
 
 The implementation of this function should honor the @var{stayopen}
 flag set by the @code{set@var{DB}ent} function whenever this makes sense.
 
-Before the function returns the implementation should store the value of
-the local @var{errno} variable in the variable pointed to be
-@var{errnop}.  This is important to guarantee the module working in
+Before the function returns, the implementation should store the value of
+the local @var{errno} variable in the variable pointed to by
+@var{errnop}.  This is important to guarantee the module works in
 statically linked programs.
 
 Again, this function takes an additional last argument for the
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[PATCH 30/37] Manual typos: DES Encryption and Password Handling

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/crypt.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/crypt.texi |    8 ++++----
 1 file changed, 4 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/crypt.texi b/manual/crypt.texi
index fd007cf..d5ea50a 100644
--- a/manual/crypt.texi
+++ b/manual/crypt.texi
@@ -307,7 +307,7 @@ defined in @file{crypt.h}.
 
 @comment rpc/des_crypt.h
 @comment SUNRPC
-@deftypefun int ecb_crypt (char *@var{key}, char *@var{blocks}, unsigned @var{len}, unsigned @var{mode})
+@deftypefun int ecb_crypt (char *@var{key}, char *@var{blocks}, unsigned int @var{len}, unsigned int @var{mode})
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
 
 The function @code{ecb_crypt} encrypts or decrypts one or more blocks
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ least-significant bit of @code{key[7]}.  The @var{key} should have the
 correct parity.
 
 @var{len} is the number of bytes in @var{blocks}.  It should be a
-multiple of 8 (so that there is a whole number of blocks to encrypt).
+multiple of 8 (so that there are a whole number of blocks to encrypt).
 @var{len} is limited to a maximum of @code{DES_MAXDATA} bytes.
 
 The result of the encryption replaces the input in @var{blocks}.
@@ -390,7 +390,7 @@ This macro returns 1 if @var{err} is a `success' result code from
 
 @comment rpc/des_crypt.h
 @comment SUNRPC
-@deftypefun int cbc_crypt (char *@var{key}, char *@var{blocks}, unsigned @var{len}, unsigned @var{mode}, char *@var{ivec})
+@deftypefun int cbc_crypt (char *@var{key}, char *@var{blocks}, unsigned int @var{len}, unsigned int @var{mode}, char *@var{ivec})
 @safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
 
 The function @code{cbc_crypt} encrypts or decrypts one or more blocks
@@ -409,7 +409,7 @@ Usually, @var{ivec} is set to 8 random bytes before encryption starts.
 Then the 8 random bytes are transmitted along with the encrypted data
 (without themselves being encrypted), and passed back in as @var{ivec}
 for decryption.  Another possibility is to set @var{ivec} to 8 zeroes
-initially, and have the first the block encrypted consist of 8 random
+initially, and have the first block encrypted consist of 8 random
 bytes.
 
 Otherwise, all the parameters are similar to those for @code{ecb_crypt}.
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[PATCH 28/37] Manual typos: System Management

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/sysinfo.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/sysinfo.texi |   52 +++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------
 1 file changed, 26 insertions(+), 26 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/sysinfo.texi b/manual/sysinfo.texi
index 1fbfb95..e15eddf 100644
--- a/manual/sysinfo.texi
+++ b/manual/sysinfo.texi
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ computer networks were an issue, it's just a word like @samp{chicken}.
 
 But any system attached to the Internet or any network like it conforms
 to a more rigorous naming convention as part of the Domain Name System
-(DNS).  In DNS, every host name is composed of two parts:
+(DNS).  In the DNS, every host name is composed of two parts:
 @cindex DNS
 @cindex Domain Name System
 
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@ You will note that ``hostname'' looks a lot like ``host name'', but is
 not the same thing, and that people often incorrectly refer to entire
 host names as ``domain names.''
 
-In DNS, the full host name is properly called the FQDN (Fully Qualified
+In the DNS, the full host name is properly called the FQDN (Fully Qualified
 Domain Name) and consists of the hostname, then a period, then the
 domain name.  The domain name itself usually has multiple components
 separated by periods.  So for example, a system's hostname may be
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ separated by periods.  So for example, a system's hostname may be
 its FQDN (which is its host name) is @samp{chicken.ai.mit.edu}.
 @cindex FQDN
 
-Adding to the confusion, though, is that DNS is not the only name space
+Adding to the confusion, though, is that the DNS is not the only name space
 in which a computer needs to be known.  Another name space is the
 NIS (aka YP) name space.  For NIS purposes, there is another domain
 name, which is called the NIS domain name or the YP domain name.  It
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ need not have anything to do with the DNS domain name.
 @cindex NIS domain name
 @cindex YP domain name
 
-Confusing things even more is the fact that in DNS, it is possible for
+Confusing things even more is the fact that in the DNS, it is possible for
 multiple FQDNs to refer to the same system.  However, there is always
 exactly one of them that is the true host name, and it is called the
 canonical FQDN.
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ by calling these functions.
 This function returns the host name of the system on which it is called,
 in the array @var{name}.  The @var{size} argument specifies the size of
 this array, in bytes.  Note that this is @emph{not} the DNS hostname.
-If the system participates in DNS, this is the FQDN (see above).
+If the system participates in the DNS, this is the FQDN (see above).
 
 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  In
 @theglibc{}, @code{gethostname} fails if @var{size} is not large
@@ -172,7 +172,7 @@ The specifics of this function are analogous to @code{gethostname}, above.
 @cindex NIS domain name
 @cindex YP domain name
 
-@code{getdomainname} sets the NIS (aka YP) domain name of the system
+@code{setdomainname} sets the NIS (aka YP) domain name of the system
 on which it is called.  Note that this is not the more popular DNS
 domain name.  Set that with @code{sethostname}.
 
@@ -295,7 +295,7 @@ This is the host name of this particular computer.  In @theglibc{},
 the value is the same as that returned by @code{gethostname};
 see @ref{Host Identification}.
 
-@ gethostname() is implemented with a call to uname().
+@code{gethostname} is implemented with a call to @code{uname}.
 
 @item char domainname[]
 This is the NIS or YP domain name.  It is the same value returned by
@@ -317,9 +317,9 @@ use of the rest of the structure.
 @c proc_uname and then gethostname.
 The @code{uname} function fills in the structure pointed to by
 @var{info} with information about the operating system and host machine.
-A non-negative value indicates that the data was successfully stored.
+A non-negative return value indicates that the data was successfully stored.
 
-@code{-1} as the value indicates an error.  The only error possible is
+@code{-1} as the return value indicates an error.  The only error possible is
 @code{EFAULT}, which we normally don't mention as it is always a
 possibility.
 @end deftypefun
@@ -373,7 +373,7 @@ necessary filesystems.  The information about all the filesystems
 actually mounted is normally kept in a file named either
 @file{/var/run/mtab} or @file{/etc/mtab}.  Both files share the same
 syntax and it is crucial that this syntax is followed all the time.
-Therefore it is best to never directly write the files.  The functions
+Therefore it is best to never directly write to the files.  The functions
 described in this section can do this and they also provide the
 functionality to convert the external textual representation to the
 internal representation.
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ files as described herein.
 @vindex MNTTAB
 @vindex MOUNTED
 The filenames given above should never be used directly.  The portable
-way to handle these file is to use the macro @code{_PATH_FSTAB},
+way to handle these files is to use the macros @code{_PATH_FSTAB},
 defined in @file{fstab.h}, or @code{_PATH_MNTTAB}, defined in
 @file{mntent.h} and @file{paths.h}, for @file{fstab}; and the macro
 @code{_PATH_MOUNTED}, also defined in @file{mntent.h} and
@@ -458,9 +458,9 @@ possible values:
 
 @vtable @code
 @item FSTAB_RW
-The filesystems gets mounted with read and write enabled.
+The filesystem gets mounted with read and write enabled.
 @item FSTAB_RQ
-The filesystems gets mounted with read and write enabled.  Write access
+The filesystem gets mounted with read and write enabled.  Write access
 is restricted by quotas.
 @item FSTAB_RO
 The filesystem gets mounted read-only.
@@ -470,7 +470,7 @@ This is not a real filesystem, it is a swap device.
 This entry from the @file{fstab} file is totally ignored.
 @end vtable
 
-Testing for equality with these value must happen using @code{strcmp}
+Testing for equality with these values must happen using @code{strcmp}
 since these are all strings.  Comparing the pointer will probably always
 fail.
 
@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ The following functions and data structure access the @file{mtab} file.
 @comment mntent.h
 @comment BSD
 @deftp {Data Type} {struct mntent}
-This structure is used with the @code{getmntent}, @code{getmntent_t},
+This structure is used with the @code{getmntent}, @code{getmntent_r},
 @code{addmntent}, and @code{hasmntopt} functions.
 
 @table @code
@@ -619,7 +619,7 @@ list of the symbols provided in @file{mntent.h}.
 
 @vtable @code
 @item MNTTYPE_IGNORE
-This symbol expands to @code{"ignore"}.  The value is sometime used in
+This symbol expands to @code{"ignore"}.  The value is sometimes used in
 @file{fstab} files to make sure entries are not used without removing them.
 @item MNTTYPE_NFS
 Expands to @code{"nfs"}.  Using this macro sometimes could make sense
@@ -650,7 +650,7 @@ default.
 Expands to @code{"ro"}.  See the @code{FSTAB_RO} value, it means the
 filesystem is mounted read-only.
 @item MNTOPT_RW
-Expand to @code{"rw"}.  See the @code{FSTAB_RW} value, it means the
+Expands to @code{"rw"}.  See the @code{FSTAB_RW} value, it means the
 filesystem is mounted with read and write permissions.
 @item MNTOPT_SUID
 Expands to @code{"suid"}.  This means that the SUID bit (@pxref{How
@@ -681,7 +681,7 @@ which is uninteresting for all programs beside @code{dump}.
 For accessing the @file{mtab} file there is again a set of three
 functions to access all entries in a row.  Unlike the functions to
 handle @file{fstab} these functions do not access a fixed file and there
-is even a thread safe variant of the get function.  Beside this @theglibc
+is even a thread safe variant of the get function.  Besides this @theglibc{}
 contains functions to alter the file and test for specific options.
 
 @comment mntent.h
@@ -701,8 +701,8 @@ upcoming processing through the other functions of the family.  The
 parameter for @code{fopen} (@pxref{Opening Streams}) can be chosen.  If
 the file is opened for writing the file is also allowed to be empty.
 
 If the file was successfully opened @code{setmntent} returns a file
-descriptor for future use.  Otherwise the return value is @code{NULL}
+handle for future use.  Otherwise the return value is @code{NULL}
 and @code{errno} is set accordingly.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -730,13 +730,13 @@ is @math{0}.
 @c    malloc dup @ascuheap @acsmem
 @c  getmntent_r dup @mtslocale @asucorrupt @ascuheap @acucorrupt @aculock @acsmem
 The @code{getmntent} function takes as the parameter a file handle
-previously returned by successful call to @code{setmntent}.  It returns
+previously returned by a successful call to @code{setmntent}.  It returns
 a pointer to a static variable of type @code{struct mntent} which is
 filled with the information from the next entry from the file currently
 read.
 
 The file format used prescribes the use of spaces or tab characters to
-separate the fields.  This makes it harder to use name containing one
+separate the fields.  This makes it harder to use names containing one
 of these characters (e.g., mount points using spaces).  Therefore
 these characters are encoded in the files and the @code{getmntent}
 function takes care of the decoding while reading the entries back in.
@@ -809,7 +809,7 @@ chosen name.
 
 This function takes care of spaces and tab characters in the names to be
 written to the file.  It converts them and the backslash character into
-the format describe in the @code{getmntent} description above.
+the format described in the @code{getmntent} description above.
 
 This function returns @math{0} in case the operation was successful.
 Otherwise the return value is @math{1} and @code{errno} is set
@@ -886,7 +886,7 @@ ignored.  Remounting a filesystem means changing the options that control
 operations on the filesystem while it is mounted.  It does not mean
 unmounting and mounting again.
 
-For a mount, you must identify the type of the filesystem as
+For a mount, you must identify the type of the filesystem with
 @var{fstype}.  This type tells the kernel how to access the filesystem
 and can be thought of as the name of a filesystem driver.  The
 acceptable values are system dependent.  On a system with a Linux kernel
@@ -1023,7 +1023,7 @@ The mount point is busy.  (E.g. it is some process' working directory or
 has a filesystem mounted on it already).
 
 @item
-The request is to remount read-only, but there are files open for write.
+The request is to remount read-only, but there are files open for writing.
 @end itemize
 
 @item EINVAL
@@ -1177,7 +1177,7 @@ The set of available parameters depends on the kernel configuration and
 can change while the system is running, particularly when you load and
 unload loadable kernel modules.
 
-The system parameters with which @code{syslog} is concerned are arranged
+The system parameters with which @code{sysctl} is concerned are arranged
 in a hierarchical structure like a hierarchical filesystem.  To identify
 a particular parameter, you specify a path through the structure in a
 way analogous to specifying the pathname of a file.  Each component of
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[PATCH 31/37] Manual typos: Debugging support

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/debug.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/debug.texi |    4 ++--
 1 file changed, 2 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/debug.texi b/manual/debug.texi
index 25492c3..ac5121b 100644
--- a/manual/debug.texi
+++ b/manual/debug.texi
@@ -90,12 +90,12 @@ contains a printable representation of the corresponding element of
 determined), an offset into the function, and the actual return address
 (in hexadecimal).
 
-Currently, the function name and offset only be obtained on systems that
+Currently, the function name and offset can only be obtained on systems that
 use the ELF binary format for programs and libraries.  On other systems,
 only the hexadecimal return address will be present.  Also, you may need
 to pass additional flags to the linker to make the function names
 available to the program.  (For example, on systems using GNU ld, you
-must pass (@code{-rdynamic}.)
+must pass @code{-rdynamic}.)
 
 The return value of @code{backtrace_symbols} is a pointer obtained via
 the @code{malloc} function, and it is the responsibility of the caller
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[PATCH 32/37] Manual typos: POSIX Threads

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/threads.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/threads.texi |    2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)


diff --git a/manual/threads.texi b/manual/threads.texi
index 00cc725..d7fac82 100644
--- a/manual/threads.texi
+++ b/manual/threads.texi
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 @c %MENU% POSIX Threads
 @cindex pthreads
 
-This chapter describes the @glibcadj{} POSIX Thread implementation.
+This chapter describes the @glibcadj{} POSIX Threads implementation.
 
 @menu
 * Thread-specific Data::          Support for creating and
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[PATCH 24/37] Manual typos: Processes

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/process.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/process.texi |    2 +-
 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)


diff --git a/manual/process.texi b/manual/process.texi
index 25bdb8e..67b3237 100644
--- a/manual/process.texi
+++ b/manual/process.texi
@@ -497,7 +497,7 @@ information about signals, see @ref{Signal Handling}.
 File descriptors open in the existing process image remain open in the
 new process image, unless they have the @code{FD_CLOEXEC}
 (close-on-exec) flag set.  The files that remain open inherit all
-attributes of the open file description from the existing process image,
+attributes of the open file descriptors from the existing process image,
 including file locks.  File descriptors are discussed in @ref{Low-Level I/O}.
 
 Streams, by contrast, cannot survive through @code{exec} functions,
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[PATCH 04/37] Manual typos: Character Handling

Rical Jasan
In reply to this post by Rical Jasan
2016-05-06  Rical Jasan  <[hidden email]>

        * manual/ctype.texi: Fix typos in the manual.
---
 manual/ctype.texi |    4 ++--
 1 file changed, 2 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)


diff --git a/manual/ctype.texi b/manual/ctype.texi
index 2d73d4e..818c095 100644
--- a/manual/ctype.texi
+++ b/manual/ctype.texi
@@ -345,8 +345,8 @@ This type is defined in @file{wctype.h}.
 @c compiler optimizations, but given the decision that setlocale is
 @c MT-Unsafe, all this would afford us would be the ability to not mark
 @c this function with @mtslocale.
-The @code{wctype} returns a value representing a class of wide
-characters which is identified by the string @var{property}.  Beside
+@code{wctype} returns a value representing a class of wide
+characters which is identified by the string @var{property}.  Besides
 some standard properties each locale can define its own ones.  In case
 no property with the given name is known for the current locale
 selected for the @code{LC_CTYPE} category, the function returns zero.
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